Meet the candidates, part 4: Texas’s 23rd Congressional District (the Republicans)

As the primaries approach, The Big Bend Sentinel is letting candidates introduce themselves. Part four in our series: Texas's 23rd congressional district (the Republicans)

TRI-COUNTY — Welcome to part four of our meet-the-candidates series. The primaries are on March 3. Residents can make sure they’re on the voter rolls by contacting the Presidio County tax assessor/collector’s office at 432-729-4081.

In this week’s installment, we’re bringing you the Republican candidates vying for Texas’s 23rd Congressional District. As we noted last week, the 23rd is famously “purple” and one of the most watched races in the state, if not the country. Republican Will Hurd, a (relatively) middle-of-the-road Republican congressman who focuses on bipartisan issues like cybersecurity and human trafficking, has held the district since 2015. In the midterm elections of 2018, Democratic candidate Gina Ortiz Jones challenged him and lost by just 926 votes. 

But Hurd announced last year that he was retiring, and it’s an even more crowded race this election this year, with a total of 14 candidates running in both the Democratic and Republican primaries. In the interest of space, we’ve split this race into two parts — bringing you the Democratic candidates last week and, now, the Republicans. Here are those Republican candidates, in their own words. We’ve edited these interviews for clarity and brevity.

ALMA ARREDONDO-LYNCH

Introduce yourself. Why are you running for office?

I am running for Congress District 23 in the Republican primary because this district is not properly and prudently represented in Congress by the current representative, as he does not share our values.  I understand the diverse challenges to District 23 and its people.

 It’s a crowded field. What sets you apart — and what are your two top issues?

What sets me apart is that I face the same challenges as ranchers, business owners, veterans, seniors, families and those serving in Border Patrol and law enforcement. I am a dentist and rancher, and my late husband was a special agent in charge with U. S. Customs. In addition, I was born and raised along the border. I ran for Congress in 2018 with only 14 votes shy of 6000 votes, and over the past 3 years I have had the opportunity to meet, listen to and understand the challenges of the people of District 23. The top two issues are preserving the sanctity of life and preserving our constitutional rights and sovereignty.

What are the primary challenges facing the 23rd?

The district consists of urban and rural, farming and ranching; all of which share the following five challenges – border security, human trafficking, drugs, gun rights and highways.

The 23rd is sometimes called a “swing” or “purple” district. In this hyper-partisan era, how do you plan to reach voters across the aisle?

By understanding the challenges and issues that face all the people of District 23, I am able to garner support from those who normally would vote in another party because they know I understand them and am willing to be their voice.

The border — both in terms of immigration and trade — is a major political issue here. What are you thoughts on the myriad border issues affecting this region, from undocumented migrants to transmigrantes?

Only legal immigration through the proper channels can be tolerated. Mexico should do their part in stemming the flow of the caravans and transmigrantes. Only with trade and developing better relations with Mexico will more effective action be taken regarding the transmigration problem. Trade is essential to both the United States and Mexico and we should have a good trade agreement with Mexico.

Rural healthcare is hard to access in our area and across Texas. What efforts would you make to serve your constituents’ healthcare needs and access to specialty care?

The rural hospitals are an essential part of District 23. Without them, people will lose access to basic healthcare and emergency services.  Working with the hospital districts and counties to ensure the continued availability of the basic and emergency care. Specialty care is often only intermittently available in rural areas. As a provider of dental services, I understand the needs for specialty care in rural areas and will work toward enhancing the availability of specialty care.

 

DARWIN BOEDEKER

Introduce yourself. Why are you running for office?

I’m from Tilden, about an hour and a half south of San Antonio. When people say they are from a small town I usually just laugh, because I only had nine kids in my senior class. I grew up in a very conservative house, and I thank God every day that I did! I am the owner of Texas guns shows which promote our Second Amendment in a trade-show format, and I’ve been fighting for our rights for the last 18 years with no spotlight on me. They say character is what you do when no one’s watching. If that is the case, then the character I have when it comes to the love of our guns is unmatched by any other candidate in this race!

I’m tired of having a bunch of good old boys on our side who are too afraid of the PC [politically correct] culture to say what we’re all thinking. I can’t be fired from my job and I’m not beholden to any establishment. I say what I think and I mean what I say, and it’s damn time that we have somebody like that on our side.

It’s a crowded field. What sets you apart — and what are your two top issues?

What sets me apart is I have owned my own business and know what it is like to maintain a balanced budget. I know what it is like to pay your employees before paying yourself. If you don’t have it, you don’t spend it. My two top issues are the Second Amendment and securing the border, which includes having the only plan to address the 30,000,000 illegals already living here.

What are the primary challenges facing the 23rd?

The primary challenges facing the 23rd are human trafficking, illegal aliens crossing and tying up law enforcement and medical facilities, and job growth!

The 23rd is sometimes called a “swing” or “purple” district. In this hyper-partisan era, how do you plan to reach voters across the aisle?

I don’t plan on reaching across any aisle. We have had 40 years of that and what has it gotten us? Twenty-two trillion in debt, child indoctrination from kinder to college, single-parent households or no-parent households, boys using girls’ bathrooms and domination of female sports by MEN. Everyone gets a trophy even if you suck. We cannot give zeros in schools even if a child misses the day! No thank you to reaching across the aisle. What I will do is stand up and fight at the top of my voice that we have had enough of losing our country from within!  Show people from the other side why they want to leave the dark side and join us!

The border — both in terms of immigration and trade — is a major political issue here. What are you thoughts on the myriad border issues affecting this region, from undocumented migrants to transmigrantes?

Any asylum seekers or migrants coming from Central America had to pass through other countries before making it to the U.S. Mexico has stepped up on their southern border and more of that is needed. The next thing we have to do is tax any money sent out of the country from a noncitizen at a rate of 60 percent. No longer can you come here and rape our system and economy just to send that money back to your country. If you want to become an American citizen, then no tax. As far as trade goes, it needs to be equal or reciprocal.

Rural healthcare is hard to access in our area and across Texas. What efforts would you make to serve your constituents’ healthcare needs and access to specialty care?

We need to incentivize young doctors to explore rural areas like the 23rd.  We need regional and semi-regional urgent care clinics. Also, establishing Highway 90 and Interstate 10 response teams with special ambulances and helicopters would be essential!

 

TONY GONZALES

Introduce yourself. Why are you running for office?

I am running for office in order to bring honesty and dedication back to District 23. I aim to provide an open line of communication between our citizens here in Texas and our lawmakers in DC.

It’s a crowded field. What sets you apart — and what are your two top issues?

I am a Navy veteran, a loving father, a devout Christian, and a lifelong resident of this district. I know the people of 23 because I am one of them, and I can do what needs to be done in order to open Washington back up to the people. I want to support an open free market for the American people and the people of my district, one that removes roadblocks for small business owners and blue collar workers. I support a strong national defense and a diplomatic foreign policy that can continue to protect our way of life in America.

What are the primary challenges facing the 23rd?

In 23, we see rampant government overreach. Our citizens are emptying their pockets to navigate the confusing process of starting and maintaining a small business, protecting and improving their homes, and their freedoms to live the American life they desire. Primarily, this district has been voicing their concerns on deaf ears in Washington for too long, and I want to change that.

The 23rd is sometimes called a “swing” or “purple” district. In this hyper-partisan era, how do you plan to reach voters across the aisle?

I believe that my position is one of communal growth for 23. Everyone in this district, despite their political colors, can agree that having a neighbor in Washington is better than having a career-politician. We are working on this district together as a community. When I take office, a call to me will be answered and listened to.

The border — both in terms of immigration and trade — is a major political issue here. What are you thoughts on the myriad border issues affecting this region, from undocumented migrants to transmigrantes?

I believe the immigration system as it stands is an unfinished and underaudited process that needs to be a focus in Washington in the years to come. People are in danger because of this broken system. It is our job to make sure the people in our nation, and the people that want to live in our nation, are safe and secure while they are here.

Rural healthcare is hard to access in our area and across Texas. What efforts would you make to serve your constituents’ healthcare needs and access to specialty care?

Healthcare access is a top priority with a tough solution. In rural areas throughout West Texas, some Americans must drive for long periods of time, even hours in some cases, to get the care they need. For consultations, I believe we are in a golden age of technology to improve telemedicine in this region in order to provide better immediate care for our neighbors.

 

CECIL B. JONES

Introduce yourself. Why are you running for office?

A lifelong Republican, I joined the Young Republicans in college, while majoring in political science. I am a former legal services attorney and veteran with over 40 years as an Army Reserve officer and Army civilian counterintelligence agent. I served in Afghanistan, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Honduras and Korea. When Will Hurd decided not to run for re-election, I saw this as my one opportunity to serve the people of the 23rd.

It’s a crowded field. What sets you apart — and what are your two top issues?

I have served my country and the public across the world. The experience I bring as lawyer, intelligence analyst, operations planner, espionage investigator, supervisor and budget analyst puts me in the forefront of the candidate field. I am committed to finding practical solutions to our border security, which includes a border wall and technical support and developing a national energy policy based on Texas’ model of integrated energy production, using oil and gas with renewable energy initiatives. As a veteran, I will work to ensure the VA provides the level of care our veterans deserve. A balanced budget is important to maintain the American dream of prosperity and comfort.

What are the primary challenges facing the 23rd?

One of the biggest challenges is developing and maintaining sustainable jobs across the district. The key has to be preparing students for the future needs of the local economy. As a junior college graduate, I understand the importance of entry-level college education and feel the community college systems in the area are a great avenue to build a more vibrant and focused educational base, ensuring students have the opportunity to select the best pathway to success.

The 23rd is sometimes called a “swing” or “purple” district. In this hyper-partisan era, how do you plan to reach voters across the aisle?

I have been tirelessly going door-to-door and presenting my platform at public forums. Through personal visits to the Big Bend area and use of social media, I hope to reach voters and provide them with a real choice in the election. My recent trip to Alpine, Marfa, Presidio, Terlingua and Big Bend National Park was an exciting and solid experience. The people I interacted with shared their political and economic concerns with me. I hope my efforts translate into votes in the upcoming Republican primary.

The border — both in terms of immigration and trade — is a major political issue here. What are your thoughts on the myriad border issues affecting this region, from undocumented migrants to transmigrantes?

I am undeniably a supporter of a physical border barrier. When we traveled the beautiful FM 170 from Presidio to Terlingua, I could not help but notice there was no physical barrier to prevent illegal migrants from entering Texas. The only thing preventing this from becoming a migration avenue are the mountains themselves. Here, minimum fencing will probably be sufficient to secure the border without detracting from the surrounding beauty.

We need to rewrite our national immigration policy to better effect a fair and reasonable process toward legal immigration into the U.S.. Undocumented migrants, or illegal migrants as I still refer to them, pose a serious issue to our legal and welfare systems. I have gone on the record at several Republican forums, probably to my detriment, supporting an equitable solution to the DACA situation. I believe the DACA individuals should be allowed to stay in the U.S. under certain situations and provided status. Then,  they can then begin the long road toward citizenship.

I agree with Presidio Mayor John Ferguson, who has major concerns about the Mexican government possibly directing transmigrante traffic through Ojinaga. His concerns seem to be the largely unregulated aspect of the commercial traffic and possible targeting of the transmigrantes by the cartels. Whoever represents the 23rd will definitely need to work with local governments in the Big Bend area in order to ensure Presidio/Ojinaga does not become the next transmigrante border crossing.

Rural healthcare is hard to access in our area and across Texas. What efforts would you make to serve your constituents’ healthcare needs and access to specialty care?

I grew up in a rural area of Mississippi and I know about the problems associated with the lack of rural health care. I am proud that my parents took the initiative and convinced our county health care office to build and open a part-time clinic in our small town. That had a tremendous impact on the availability of medical care for the poor in our area.

I’m aware there was a merger of the Brewster and Presidio health care systems into the Presidio-Brewster indigent healthcare program in 2014, but I don’t know how effective it has been on delivering better indigent healthcare to the area. While I was stationed in Honduras, we provided assistance to U.S. Army medical readiness exercises throughout Central America. We traveled by helicopter in Honduras, Guatemala, and Belize to provide basic rural medical assistance. Maybe it’s time for the military to start such a program for domestic assistance.

 

JEFF MCFARLIN

Introduce yourself. Why are you running for office?

I am a young conservative leader with a dream wife and three amazing kids. I am an energy professional and businessman. I know that a true conservative leads with honor, humility and wisdom. I will lead with these qualities and bring measurable results for the people of TX-23. My leadership will produce creative solutions without compromising my beliefs, because I will be accountable to the taxpayers of this district.

It’s a crowded field. What sets you apart — and what are your two top issues?

First of all, I am the only energy professional in the race. This district is one of the top energy producing areas in the nation and I believe that with my experience, I will best represent the people in this area. It is crucial for the entire nation that we have representatives that can intelligently articulate our energy policy and stand against ludicrous propositions like the Green New Deal. Second, I am a young conservative leader that can rally young and undecided voters in November.

Our immigration system is broken and needs a lot of work. Trump has done a great job concerning national awareness and has made great strides to deter illegal immigration with policies like “Remain in Mexico.” However, trafficking is a separate issue that needs equal awareness and deterrents. I will work with local elected officials and colleagues from across the aisle to fiercely address these issues.

What are the primary challenges facing the 23rd?

Our constituents are concerned about poverty in our district, validated by our sub-par employment stats and low-paying jobs. Our citizens are looking for a leader that can bring better jobs and stimulate the local economy, which is why I have support around my economic and infrastructure policy plans.

My infrastructure plan will bring I-27 along our three major ports of entry at the border, the Permian Basin and the cattle-producing plains of north Texas. This easement for the interstate will also include rail, electric lines, water lines and petroleum pipelines. These are essential elements for a new industrial fairway through an economically depressed part of our state.

My proposed plan includes the “China Charter,” which will help manufacturers relocate from Asia to TX-23 through the establishment of special economic zones throughout the district. We will identify available land and guarantee a workforce that is looking for secure employment and higher-paying jobs.

The 23rd is sometimes called a “swing” or “purple” district. In this hyper-partisan era, how do you plan to reach voters across the aisle?

I believe our next congressman should be focused on the issues that unite us rather than divide us. Manufacturing, jobs, and energy are the most important issues, and I am the only candidate that is well-versed in these areas. These issues transcend party lines. I will work with state and local leaders on both sides of the aisle for all people in the 23rd district.

The border — both in terms of immigration and trade — is a major political issue here. What are your thoughts on the myriad of border issues affecting this region, from undocumented migrants to transmigrantes?

Please see my previous remarks concerning immigration and trafficking. The trade component at the border is something that can’t be underestimated! We have billions of dollars to win or lose depending on how political leaders manage this issue. I believe we should look at systems used by the most efficient ports in the world, such as the Port of Savannah in Georgia. I recently met with them and saw what effective port management looks like. I am the candidate that can bring the same efficiency and excellence to our district.

Rural healthcare is hard to access in our area and across Texas. What efforts would you make to serve your constituents’ healthcare needs and access to specialty care?

Our state holds one of the highest uninsured populations in the nation. As a conservative, I believe that we should offer free-market solutions. I am a proponent of direct-access care, which has been proven effective in many areas already and provides patients with affordable options through a simple membership with their providers’ office. In addition, I believe that we should support telemedicine and give mid-level professionals the tools they need to help rural populations.

 

RAUL REYES

Introduce yourself. Why are you running for office?

I’m a retired lieutenant colonel (U.S. Air Force), born and raised on the border in Del Rio. My wife, three children and I now reside in Castroville, Medina County. Our oldest currently serves and as a 1st Lieutenant in the U.S. Air Force. I entered this race to secure the border and help bring back manufacturing and industry (jobs, jobs and more jobs) to our district.

It’s a crowded field. What sets you apart — and what are your two top issues?

I’m not an establishment politician. While in the U.S. Air Force, I served in Central and South America, executing American military strategies to assist our partner nations in countering trans-national criminal organizations. These drug-trafficking organizations have moved on to human trafficking and sexual slavery. I know how to fight them from a strategic angle and from the U.S. policy angle. As a retired lieutenant colonel, former vice president of Southwest Texas Junior College in the district and a successful home builder, I’m the most qualified at all levels. I’m actually from the district (born and raised), many are not. Finally, I’m not Hurd-endorsed. My two biggest issues are border security and jobs. I have a plan to fix all that.

What are the primary challenges facing the 23rd?

Open borders, uncontrolled illegal immigration and globalism. All of these have devastated our district. I support building the wall. I am a pro-Trump Republican and believe in the “America First” agenda.

The 23rd is sometimes called a “swing” or “purple” district. In this hyper-partisan era, how do you plan to reach voters across the aisle?

I disagree with the “purple” district mentality. Most citizens in this district are center-right. And most would vote Republican if we ran the right candidate. Raul Reyes is that candidate. In this race there are many not from this district originally. Why? Because it’s about ensuring they can keep the borders open. And, because they’re here to ensure that the one candidate (Raul Reyes) who will secure the border, who has actually met with many in our district, including many who typically vote Democrat, doesn’t win.
The key is to meet with people. There’s a walk-away movement happening where large portions of Democrats are leaving that party. But they’re going to the Republican Party of Donald Trump, not Will Hurd. This District “swings” because we, the GOP, haven’t realized this truth: We are center-right in this district. The failed “triangulation” way of voting by the incumbent is proof.

The border — both in terms of immigration and trade — is a major political issue here. What are your thoughts on the myriad border issues affecting this region, from undocumented migrants to transmigrantes?

On trade, immigration issues should have never impacted trade with Mexico and Canada. Congress’s failure to act resulted in Mr. Trump using executive policies to get things done to secure the border, which I fully support to ensure Texas families are safe and secure. Because we had a “Never Trump” Republican as our representative, most if not all the USMCA [United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement] was negotiated with zero input from our district. That is negligence by Congressman Hurd.

We need a wall. The experts, U.S. Customs and Border Protection and the U.S. Border Patrol, are asking for that tool. Congress, and specifically Will Hurd, played politics with that and here we are in a mess. Mr. Hurd continually denied we had a border crisis on national television shows (HBO, MSNBC) and national newspaper publications. Build the wall, resource CBP and Border Patrol and fix the Flores Settlement issue.

Rural healthcare is hard to access in our area and across Texas. What efforts would you make to serve your constituents’ healthcare needs and access to specialty care?

We need to allow for competition to purchase health insurance across state lines. We need to continue with deregulation. As an example, many rural areas are affected because we don’t allow for emergency care-only facilities (where serious trauma can be treated). It’s highly regulated to the point most folks need to be airlifted to larger traumas centers for care. Big Bend, Fort Stockton and Marfa are all places that can have trauma-care facilities, but we must deregulate these areas so free markets can move in and provide that service.

 

SHARON BRECKENRIDGE THOMAS

Introduce yourself. Why are you running for office?

I am the daughter of a U.S. veteran and a private practice attorney, but I also spent 15 years as a civilian JAG [judge advocate officer] attorney for the U.S. Air Force. I served as a commissioner under Governor Perry and Governor Abbott, but the greatest joy of my heart has been serving my community in pro bono legal work with my nonprofit firm and the Community Justice Foundation, and in ministry with Daily Bread Ministries and Life Change Church, where my husband and I pastor. I have been blessed to invest in students across Texas and the U.S., including a tenure at Liberty University School of Law and at my alma mater, St. Mary’s University School of Law. In my private practice, I predominantly represented business owners and nonprofits. I have also taught law for managers/businesses at the University of Texas at San Antonio and Trinity University.

I am running for Congress because I want someone in DC who will uphold the law under the Constitution and who will always be on the side of her constituents. We can’t afford to have a leader who is soft on the issues, or who doesn’t quite grasp the importance of defending our liberties wholeheartedly. I believe I am the woman to preserve our constitutional freedoms in Congress and keep this district red in November.

It’s a crowded field. What sets you apart — and what are your two top issues?

My experience serving Texans with unwavering resolve will be what constituents in TX-23 are looking for in their next representative. My top issues are protecting our Constitutional freedoms and securing our borders. Our country was founded on the principle that our religious beliefs would not be infringed upon. I plan to fight back against any threat to those liberties. Equally important, the nation will be looking to us to lead the conversation about border security. I will support President Trump in implementing a dignified legal immigration system, building a wall, and above all, protecting Americans first.

What are the primary challenges facing the 23rd?

If we do not elect the right candidate that can be strong on the issues, we risk losing our district and our rights to the Democrats. Democrats are looking to flip this seat and add another vote to impeach the president or force big government and restricted rights to the people of this district.

The 23rd is sometimes called a “swing” or “purple” district. In this hyper-partisan era, how do you plan to reach voters across the aisle?

I believe voters in this district are looking for someone who won’t be moved in their values and who will stand up for them in the hard times. I am not going to Washington to make friends; I am going to make a difference. My story and my background is one that will appeal to all voters across this district.

The border — both in terms of immigration and trade — is a major political issue here. What are you thoughts on the myriad border issues affecting this region, from undocumented migrants to transmigrantes?

A dignified legal immigration process is key for the success of our nation, but our first concern must be with the safety of the American people and protecting their liberties as well as their land. I support President Trump and will fully support the funding of a border wall, as well as providing more resources for ICE and Border Patrol along the border when I’m in Congress. The recently passed USMCA will enhance the trade relations between the U.S. and Mexico.

Rural healthcare is hard to access in our area and across Texas. What efforts would you make to serve your constituents’ healthcare needs and access to specialty care?

First, we must repeal and replace the failure that is the Affordable Care Act. This can be done while allowing for a replacement of the ACA and protecting pre-existing conditions. Every Republican plan offered to replace the ACA has allowed for the protection of pre-existing conditions.The answer is to provide people with more and better options, and more competitive service in the healthcare market.  We should work with medical schools to offer incentives for graduating medical students to intern in rural areas. We also need to bring American innovation and technology into our healthcare system to reach those all over rural Texas and beyond.

 

ALIA URESTE

Introduce yourself. Why are you running for office?

I’m running for office in U.S. House District 23-Texas because I truly and wholeheartedly care about people and families, just like mine, who live in our district.

It’s a crowded field. What sets you apart — and what are your two top issues?

I’m a nurse, businesswoman and conservative. For almost five years, I served as a non-paid Texas state commissioner and as an advisory council cabinet member of former Governor Rick Perry and Governor Greg Abbott. My two top issues are stopping illegal immigration, which can lead to human trafficking, and sustaining/creating economic opportunity for district constituents.

What are the primary challenges facing the 23rd?  

The primary challenges facing the 23rd are: connecting with voters of all ages, including Hispanics and millennials across all 29 Texas counties which are within the 23rd and encouraging consistent civic engagement and a culture of voting in primaries, not just presidential elections.

The 23rd is sometimes called a “swing” or “purple” district. In this hyper-partisan era, how do you plan to reach voters across the aisle?

Grassroots organizing and outreach is key.

The border — both in terms of immigration and trade — is a major political issue here. What are you thoughts on the myriad border issues affecting this region, from undocumented migrants to transmigrantes?

Immigrants should not be forced to leave their native lands due to economic hardship.  Working with foreign governments to end industry cronyism and monopolies must be addressed by Congress before public-private partnerships can be effectively formed.

Rural healthcare is hard to access in our area and across Texas. What efforts would you make to serve your constituents’ healthcare needs and access to specialty care?

I would vote for block-grant funding to continue to be appropriated to states so that more specialty physicians can travel to rural communities no less than one or two times monthly for patient evaluations. In addition, I’d support fully-paid tuition grants for nurses wanting to bridge from ADN to BSN to FNP, who would commit to serving rural community healthcare centers to alleviate physician shortages. I’d also work with the USDA to bring more land grant colleges to rural communities.

 

BEN VAN WINKLE

Introduce yourself. Why are you running for office?

I want to stand up for the country that our founders fought and died to build. We need youth in the conservative movement. I want to protect our Constitution, individual liberty, secure our border, fight for the lives of the unborn, protect our Second Amendment, bring jobs to the Texas 23rd District, lower the cost of healthcare, protect Social Security and Medicare, lower taxes, reduce government spending and take care of our veterans.

It’s a crowded field. What sets you apart — and what are your two top issues?

I have a unique ability to bring people together. I believe the only way that the conservative movement continues is by convincing voters why it is the better option. I will do just that. I am looking to fight to fix the gridlock in Washington caused by big money in politics, the lack of term limits and lobbying. I have ideas and will listen to the voters.

All the issues I listed above are equally important. I believe the biggest thing that we need to work on is the corruption in Washington. It is the reason for gridlock and the parties moving to polar opposite sides, but no one realizes that. If we want a Congress for the people, we have to take the corruption of power and money that politicians enjoy away. Implement term limits and eliminate big money in politics. I will fight to do just that.

What are the primary challenges facing the 23rd?

Illegal immigration, lack of jobs and healthcare in rural communities.

The 23rd is sometimes called a “swing” or “purple” district. In this hyper-partisan era, how do you plan to reach voters across the aisle?

I believe that if you have better arguments, for the most part, people will listen. I would challenge the Democratic candidate to as many forum debates as possible, in order to let voters decide which side has the better arguments. I have great arguments that I would use to combat the socialist movement on the left.

The border — both in terms of immigration and trade — is a major political issue here. What are you thoughts on the myriad border issues affecting this region, from undocumented migrants to transmigrantes?

I believe in securing our border and enforcing our laws. When you look at immigration through the scope of legality and illegality, it isn’t a hard topic at all.

Rural healthcare is hard to access in our area and across Texas. What efforts would you make to serve your constituents’ healthcare needs and access to specialty care?

I want to incentivize doctors right out of school to open practices in rural communities. They would be entitled to tax benefits and student loan forgiveness if they had a practice in rural communities.


 
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